Deficiencies in assisted living homes to be addressed

This is an update to a previous blog post.

In response to a three-part series by The San Diego Union Tribune, lawmakers have pledged to take action and ramp up efforts so the area’s assisted living home do not fall short.

The findings from the investigation, which was done by the U-T in conjunction with the CHCF Center for Health Reporting at USC, shocked legislators. It showed that people accused of abuse and neglect are rarely prosecuted, and the maximum fines are staggeringly low.

It is inexcusable that people who abuse and neglect those that they are supposed to be caring for are not being properly prosecuted. Thankfully it has now been brought to the attention of lawmakers. This can pave the way for stronger legislation and action to protect those who are being harmed.

Elder abuse is rarely investigated

Elder abuse and sexual assault are rarely investigated at assisted living homes in California.

There are about 12,000 complaints each year, but members of law enforcement have referred only 82 to state prosecutors as cases since 2002.

This raises serious issues concerning the integrity of the Department of Social Services and their regulatory system. At the same time, there have been examples of administrators that operate and staff that work at these senior care facilities who have not served the public well. These may be isolated cases, but it strains credulity there are not sufficient safeguards employed to prevent the number and frequency of injuries and tragedies.