Teen Recruits Smuggling Drugs Across Border: Feds (Sam Spital)

COMMENTARY BY SAM SPITAL, CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY SAN DIEGO:

“Channel 7 San Diego online news on November 16, 2012 reported both Mexican and American teenagers, as young as 12 years old, are being recruited by drug cartels to smuggle drugs (referred to as “mules”) across the border. Federal Agents of the Homeland Security report that last year there were 190 and so far this year nearly 130 teens who were recruited at malls, arcades and outside schools, as well as through social media, such as Facebook, were caught smuggling narcotics.. These minor children are told they will not face serious penalties in the Juvenile Court system and can earn from $50 to $500 to carry drugs under their clothing. Initially only targeting young boys, the drug cartels are using young girls as well.

At one time marijuana was the drug of choice, and now it is methamphetamine (commonly referred to as “meth”), which is a stimulant and highly addictive narcotic. Some people use meth because it can help them lose weight, although the results are extremely short lived as the body builds a tolerance and more and more has to be taken to the point it has little or no value, but by that time the individual has become addicted to it and cannot stop. Others use meth for increased energy, sexual pleasure and by those who suffer depression. Without strict controls and supervision by a competent physician, the drug can lead to brain damage and even death. Parents need to maintain open communications with their children to the point they dialogue on life issues, pick up on their children’s activities, who are their friends and are alert to changes in behavior. While society has seemingly advanced in technical ways, open and regular communications and everyday discussions seem to have been lost to text messaging and chat rooms.”

SAM SPITAL, CRIMINAL DEFENSE ATTORNEY SAN DIEGO

 

 

Feds charge 27 in California-Mexico meth ring

The continuing scourge of major crime represents a challenge for law enforcement and the judicial system that has limited resources, but the unintended consequences to those that are easily addicted to Meth often suffer life-long very complex and serious issues as well.

For defense lawyers, their role is to challenge law enforcement’s procedures and protocols that resulted in criminal charges being filed, and to advance their respective client’s rights and best interest by establishing legally sound defenses, focusing on the offense and not only defense, and to present all of the mitigating facts and circumstances. For a seasoned criminal defense lawyer who is passionate about obtaining winning solutions, this is an exciting part of the profession. For additional information and/or to obtain a free consultation, call Managing Attorney Sam Spital.