Important Choices To Preserve Humanity

President Harry Truman, on April 11, 1952, signed into law a bill that proclaimed the National Day of Prayer. Thereafter in 1988, President Ronald Reagan amended the law designating the first Thursday of May each year as the National Day of Prayer. While it is not a public holiday, there are countless prayer gatherings across the United States, many of which are non-denominational.  As we all know, these are troubling times when we read about or view news accounts of horrific crimes and mass killings, hate mongers, widespread and highly polarized dissension, along with an increasing number of individuals who can be classified as morally bankrupt and/or lawless, lacking integrity, respect and appreciation of others. The new reality has brought forward the adage (click this link), “If we see something, say something.

Nonetheless, all of us need to underscore the world is a magnificent place and people are basically good, even though there are exceptions which are often characterized as the new norm. Aside from what solid values, positive attitudes as well as divergent ideas, opinions and religious beliefs can bring to humanity, we need to have healthy relationships and strong support systems. We can make important choices to preserve humanity in today’s world,  and make all of our lives better.

Let us start by smiling (click this link), as when it comes from the heart, it can be priceless.  And, if you are not used to or feel comfortable smiling, try to think of a good reason to do so in a genuine way. The social value of a smile is that it shows we are likeable, happy and content. A smile is our gift to others, but most importantly (click this link), smiles are infectious for those in our surrounding to feel important, and appreciated. In addition, smiling can improve our own mood and, therefore, increase our positive thoughts and feelings.

Taking this one step further, we have all heard that “laughter is the best medicine.” And, studies have shown (click this link to read) how laughter can be powerful, referencing among other consequences, happier individuals live longer. In contrast to a “toxic” life filled with, among other emotions,  stress from negativity, exposure to violence, and/or loneliness,  positive thinking can produce a healthier and happier life.

Rabbi Dorsch of the Tifereth Israel Synagogue in San Diego was interviewed by KGTV Channel 10 News on Sunday, April 28, 2019 in response to the horrific killing at a local synagogue was quoted saying (click this link), “We have to give one another hugs and say we are not going to let this destroy us.” There has been a great deal written, considered highly effective and adopted by therapists that hugs have a synergistic effect (the whole is greater than the parts, or 2+2 =5 or 6), including the famous author and psychotherapist Virginia Satir, who is is a pioneer in the messaging value of hugs in family therapy and quoted in “10 Reasons Why We Need at Least 8 Hugs a Day” (click this link).

In conclusion, all of us can provide to others, and realize for ourselves, happiness, along with innumerable social and health benefits from a smile; and smiling can turn into laughter, which in and of itself is worth celebrating. Let’s not be part of the problem, but part of the solution, as we take each step today and forever. We can indeed make important choices in today’s world to preserve humanity, one person and one day at a time.

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